Author : Pedro Lobo

Quick Tip: Access Menu bar Commands

This article is heavily focused on the MAC platform

Menubar

As you may well know, Actions relies heavily on an app’s existing keyboard shortcuts to trigger actions. Unfortunately there are a myriad of apps that offer a very limited set of keyboard shortcuts. A common workaround in the past would be to create a global shortcut to trigger the menu bar entry and then assign it in Actions.

With the introductions of Flows, I thought it was about time to pare down the dozens of shortcuts I had create and instead rely on just one: Move focus to the menu bar. I soon realised that this was unreliable. Numerous threads online advised changing the default shortcut (^F2), however this still produced erratic behaviour. After a couple of days it would simply stop working and I’d have to change the shortcut once again.

Frustration quickly set in and as any respectful self appointed nerd would do, I hastened to create a script to change this shortcut on the fly. Fortunately common sense prevailed. I took a step back and found a simpler, albeit not as obvious solution.

Streamline Your Search With Google and Actions

Google-Fu

I’m sure that by now you harbor no doubt that Actions is a powerful tool. Its versatility rivaled only by its good looks and the things you can accomplish, limited only by your imagination. OK, I’m exaggerating a little since it does have limitations, but the point I’m trying to make is that with a little bit of creativity, you can combine Actions with tools and services you wouldn’t normally think about – case in point: Google Search.

Over the years, Google Search has evolved beyond a mere search engine. It can inform you of the weather, stock and perform conversions to name just a few things. You can read their extensive documentation to learn more.

Quick and Visual GTD with Actions and The Secret Weapon

This article is heavily focused on the MAC platform

Evernote, Actions and The Secret Weapon for GTD
There’s no shortage of examples of enterprising users leveraging an apps features to do something other than initially intended. One such case is that of The Secret Weapon (TSW). I’ll let you learn more about what TSW is from their website, but in essence, it uses Evernote as a GTD system. As wild and improbable as this may sound, users swear by it and getting to grips with the workflow is a trivial matter.

TSW uses tags to break tasks up into a couple main contexts: When, What, Who and Where and Notebooks to differentiate between Pending Actions and Completed Actions.